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SQL: Home

Getting Started with SQL

Check Out a Book to Learn More about SQL
Link to Sams Teach Yourself SQL in 24 Hours by Ryan Stephens in the Catalog
Link to SQL by Allen Taylor in the Catalog
Link to Learning SQL by Alan Beaulieu in the Catalog
Link to SQL Cookbook by Anthony Molinaro in the Catalog
Link to SQL in Easy Steps by Mike McGrath in the Catalog
Link to Sam Teach Yourself SQL in 10 minutes in the Catalog
Link to SQL QuickStart Guide by Walter Shields in the Catalog
What is SQL?

 

SQL or Structured Query Language is a critical tool for data professionals. It is undoubtedly the most important language for getting a job in the field of data analysis or data sciences.

Millions of data points are being generated every minute and raw data does not have any story to tell. After all this data gets stored in databases and professionals use SQL to extract this data for further analysis.

SQL is the most common language for extracting and organizing data that is stored in a relational database. A database is a table that consists of rows and columns. SQL is the language of databases. It facilitates retrieving specific information from databases that are further used for analysis.   (Continue reading from Springboard)

SQL Application

SQL is used in health care (cancer registries) business (inventories, trends analysis), and education. It even has applications in the defense industry.  Who works with SQL? Database developers and administrators and business analysts are among the better known users. But knowing at least a little SQL can be an asset for people in a lot of different roles, from the web developer to the PhD level scientist. The most basic task is the query -- you specify "from" to tell the program what table(s) to retrieve data from and give additional clauses like "where" and "having" to narrow down what you want. (Continue reading from Sottware Engineer Insider)