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Creative Writing: About

Creative Writing

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Creative Writing 101

Creative writing: You can take classes in it, you can earn a degree in it, but the only things you really need to do it are your creative thinking and writing tools. Creative writing is the act of putting your imagination on a page. It’s artistic expression in words; it’s writing without the constraints that come with other kinds of writing like persuasive or expository. 

Creative writing is writing meant to evoke emotion in a reader by communicating a theme. In storytelling (including literature, movies, graphic novels, creative nonfiction, and many video games), the theme is the central meaning the work communicates. 

Take the movie (and the novel upon which it’s based) Jaws, for instance. The story is about a shark that terrorizes a beach community and the men tasked with killing the shark. But the film’s themes include humanity’s desire to control nature, tradition vs. innovation, and how potential profit can drive people in power to make dangerous, even fatal, decisions. 

A theme isn’t the only factor that defines creative writing. Here are other components usually found in creative writing:

  • Connecting, or at least attempting to connect, with the reader’s emotions
  • Writing from a specific point of view
  • Organizing the text around a narrative structure 
  • A narrative structure can be complex or simple and serves to shape how the reader interacts with the content.
  • Using imaginative and/or descriptive language

Creative writing typically uses literary devices like metaphors and foreshadowing to build a narrative and express the theme, but this isn’t a requirement. Neither is dialogue, though you’ll find it used in most works of fiction. Creative writing doesn’t have to be fictional, either. Dramatized presentations of true stories, memoirs, and observational humor pieces are all types of creative writing. Continue reading from Grammarly

From Our Collection

Link to First You Write A Sentence by Joe Moran in the Catalog
Link to Elements of Fiction by Walter Mosley in the Catalog
Link to Murder Your Darlings by Roy Peter Clark in the Catalog
Link to Creative Writing Workshop by Miguel D'Addario in Freading
Link to 303 Writing Prompts by Bonnie Neubauer in the Catalog
Link to Letters to a Young Writer by Colum McCann in the Catalog
Link to From Idea to Novel: Mastering the Process by Elizabeth George in the Catalog
Link to The Thorn Necklace by Francesca Lia Block in the Catalog
Link to Pep Talks for Writers by Grant Faulkner in the Catalog
Link to Beyond the Writers' Workshop by Carol Bly in the Catalog
Link to Just Write: Here's How by Walter Dean Myers in the Catalog
Link to Damn Fine Story by Chuck Wendig in the Catalog
Link to The Hidden Machinery by Margot Livesey in the Catalog

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