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Decades: 2010

New York Times Bestsellers

2010
RECORD OF THE YEAR
Need You Now
ALBUM OF THE YEAR
The Suburbs
SONG OF THE YEAR
Need You Now
BEST NEW ARTIST
Esperanza Spalding
 

2011
RECORD OF THE YEAR
Rolling In The Deep
ALBUM OF THE YEAR
21
SONG OF THE YEAR
Rolling In The Deep
BEST NEW ARTIST
Bon Iver
 

2012
RECORD OF THE YEAR
Somebody That I Used To Know
ALBUM OF THE YEAR
Babel
SONG OF THE YEAR
We Are Young
BEST NEW ARTIST
Fun.
 

2013
RECORD OF THE YEAR
Get Lucky
ALBUM OF THE YEAR
Random Access Memories
SONG OF THE YEAR
Royals
BEST NEW ARTIST
Macklemore & Ryan Lewis
 

2014
RECORD OF THE YEAR
Stay With Me (Darkchild Version)
ALBUM OF THE YEAR
Morning Phase
SONG OF THE YEAR
Stay With Me (Darkchild Version)
BEST NEW ARTIST
Sam Smith
 

2015
RECORD OF THE YEAR
Uptown Funk
ALBUM OF THE YEAR
1989
SONG OF THE YEAR
Thinking Out Loud
BEST NEW ARTIST
Meghan Trainor
 

2016
RECORD OF THE YEAR
Hello
ALBUM OF THE YEAR
25
SONG OF THE YEAR
Hello
BEST NEW ARTIST
Chance The Rapper
 

2017
RECORD OF THE YEAR
24K Magic
ALBUM OF THE YEAR
24K Magic
SONG OF THE YEAR
That's What I Like
BEST NEW ARTIST
Alessia Cara
 

2018
RECORD OF THE YEAR
This Is America
ALBUM OF THE YEAR
Golden Hour
SONG OF THE YEAR
This Is America
BEST NEW ARTIST
Dua Lipa
 

2019
RECORD OF THE YEAR
Bad Guy
ALBUM OF THE YEAR
When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?
SONG OF THE YEAR
Bad Guy
BEST NEW ARTIST
Billie Eilish

Google Web Search

Presidents of the United States of America

Biggest Headlines

End of NASA's Space Shuttle Program

Between the first launch on April 12, 1981, and the final landing on July 21, 2011, NASA's space shuttle fleet -- Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour -- flew 135 missions, helped construct the International Space Station and inspired generations. The final space shuttle mission, STS-135, ended July 21, 2011 when Atlantis rolled to a stop at its home port, NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (Continue reading from National Aeronautics and Space Administration)

Osama Bin Laden Dead

President Obama addresses the Nation to announce that the United States has killed Osama bin Laden, the leader of al Qaeda.

For over two decades, bin Laden has been al Qaeda’s leader and symbol, and has continued to plot attacks against our country and our friends and allies.  The death of bin Laden marks the most significant achievement to date in our nation’s effort to defeat al Qaeda. (Continue reading from President Obama's Address on Osama Bin Laden)

Superstorm Sandy

On October 29, 2012, lives were changed forever along the shores of New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, and in the two dozen United States affected by what meteorologists are calling Superstorm Sandy. The landscape of the East Coast was also changed, though no geologist would ever use the word "forever" when referring to the shape of a barrier island. (Continue reading from National Aeronautics and Space Administration)

Boston Marathon Bombing

The Boston Marathon Bombing was a terrorist attack that occurred on April 15, 2013, when two bombs went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three spectators and wounding more than 260 other people. After an intense manhunt, police captured one of the bombing suspects, 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, whose older brother and fellow suspect, 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev, died following a shootout with law enforcement. Investigators concluded that the Tsarnaevs, who spent part of their childhoods in the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan, planned and carried out the attack on their own and were not connected to any terrorist groups. (Continue reading from History.com)

Baltimore Riots

A largely peaceful protest over the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man who suffered a spinal cord injury in police custody, gave way to scattered scenes of chaos here on Saturday night, as demonstrators smashed a downtown storefront window, threw rocks and bottles and damaged police cruisers, while officers in riot gear broke up skirmishes and made 12 arrests near Camden Yards. (Continue reading from The New York Times)

Me Too Movement

The ‘me too.’ movement was founded in 2006 to help survivors of sexual violence, particularly Black women and girls, and other young women of color from low wealth communities, find pathways to healing. Our vision from the beginning was to address both the dearth in resources for survivors of sexual violence and to build a community of advocates, driven by survivors, who will be at the forefront of creating solutions to interrupt sexual violence in their communities. (Continue reading from The Me Too Movement)

2010 Earthquake in Haiti

2010 Haiti earthquake, large-scale earthquake that occurred January 12, 2010, on the West Indian island of Hispaniola, comprising the countries of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Most severely affected was Haiti, occupying the western third of the island. An exact death toll proved elusive in the ensuing chaos. The Haitian government’s official count was more than 300,000, but other estimates were considerably smaller. Hundreds of thousands of survivors were displaced. (Continue reading from Encyclopaedia Britannica)

Deflategate

Deflategate refers to the scandal that ensued after the Colts accused the Patriots of deflating their footballs to give quarterback Tom Brady an unfair edge — an accusation that the N.F.L. and its commissioner, Roger Goodell, ultimately determined was probably true. (Continue reading from The New York Times)

Edward Snowden

In 2013, Edward Snowden was an IT systems expert working under contract for the National Security Agency when he traveled to Hong Kong to provide three journalists with thousands of top-secret documents about U.S. intelligence agencies' surveillance of American citizens.

To Snowden, the classified information he shared with the journalists exposed privacy abuses by government intelligence agencies. He saw himself as a whistleblower. But the U.S. government considered him a traitor in violation of the Espionage Act. (Continue reading from NPR)

Flint, Michigan Water Crisis

On April 25, 2014, officials looking to save money switched Flint, Michigan’s drinking water supply from the Detroit city system to the Flint River. This new water was highly corrosive. Because city and state officials broke federal law by failing to treat the water properly, lead leached out from aging pipes into thousands of homes.

Soon after the switch, Flint residents complained about dark-colored, foul-tasting, smelly water as well as skin rashes and hair loss. Independent tests found that a significant proportion of samples had lead levels well above the “action level” for lead set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In fact, some samples showed lead levels more than 100 times the action level. Some 9,000 children, who are particularly sensitive to lead and its effects, were exposed to contaminated water. (Continue reading from The Natural Resources and Defense Council)

Library Research Resources

Interested in seeing what else happened in this decade? Use our resources to find out more!

     

     

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