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The Poetry of WWI: 1914-1918

 

The Poetry of the First World War

No conflict has ever been so closely linked with the poetry and literature of its age than the First World War. When we consider the writers who emerged from this era, one of the most prominent is Siegfried Sassoon. His poetry is remembered for the satirical edge of its criticism of the military high command and disdain for unquestioning patriotism, with the anger and indignation present in much of his verse characteristic of many men who served in the trenches. Read more...

WestportREADS 2018

WestportREADS, organized annually by the Library since 2001, is once again underway, this time exploring the themes of healing and perseverance through Pat Barker's Regeneration. 


 

Regeneration: Plot Overview

Regeneration begins with Siegfried Sassoon's open letter, dated July 1917, protesting the conduct and insincerities of the First World War. The letter has been published in the London Times and has received much attention in England, as many people are upset over the length and toll of the war thus far. The army is not sure what to do with Sassoon, as his letter clearly threatens to undermine the strength of the war effort at home. Read more...

 

 

Learn more about Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen

How First World War Poetry Painted a Truer Picture

Siegfried Sassoon, one of many WW1 poets who transformed literature's landscape, portrayed the conflict with a gritty realism previously avoided by the romanticists.

No conflict has ever been so closely linked with the poetry and literature of its age than the First World War. When we consider the writers who emerged from this era, one of the most prominent is Siegfried Sassoon. His poetry is remembered for the satirical edge of its criticism of the military high command and disdain for unquestioning patriotism, with the anger and indignation present in much of his verse characteristic of many men who served in the trenches. Read more...

 

Four First World War Writers Who Defined the Conflict


From the sounding of the first gun, the First World War inspired enormous quantities of literature. Here, we focus on four writers – Henri Barbusse, Ernst Jünger, Vera Brittain and Erich Maria Remarque – whose works helped define the 1914-18 conflict.

The First World War was the first conflict to spawn a wealth of artistic output from those who fought on its battlefields. The Somme alone saw more writers take part than any other battle in history, including Siegfried Sassoon, Robert Graves, JRR Tolkien and Edmund Blunden. There, and on other fighting fronts, a new breed of well-educated soldier vividly chronicled their first-hand experiences through words, art and music. Read more...