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How to Use Microfilm: Home

Why Use Newspapers?

Newspaper articles can provide a useful source of information, serving as a primary source of information about historical and current events. Because newspapers also contain commentaries or retrospective articles about events, they can also serve as a secondary source. Whether used as a primary or a secondary source, newspapers can provide a valuable research tool. More...

Current Microfilm Collection

Westport Standard Mar 1925 - Dec 1925

Westport Herald Jan 1903 - Dec 1955

Westport Town Crier July 1960 - May 1970

Fairpress Mar 1954 - June 1975

Fairfield County Fair Mar 1954 - Aug 1960

Westport News Mar 1964 - current

Minuteman Oct 1993 - current

Wall Street Journal 2001 - 2006

Scientific American Jan 1952 - June 2010

Time 1923 - 2011

New York Times Jan 2014 - current

How to Use Our Microfilm

1. First pick the Microfilm that you would like to view.

2. Go onto the computer and click on the icon labeled ViewScan Premium

3. Pull out the tray at point C to allow you to feed the microfilm under the transparent plate

4. Next take the roll of film and insert it at point A, making sure the roll is facing to the right and overhand.

5. You'll want to spool the film as indicated from point A to B in this picture (under, under, and over):

6. Secure the end of the film in point B

7. Push the tray back in at point C so that the microfilm is directly under the camera

8. Using the forward and backwards buttons you can now look through the roll at your own pace!

9. Once you've found what you're looking for you have the option to email it to yourself, save to USB, or print. Ask how at the reference desk!

Don't forget our digital newspapers! 

Check out ProQuest to see our online databases.

ABI/INFORM Collection

(1971 - current) The ABI/INFORM Collection is comprised of ABI/INFORM Global, ABI/INFORM Trade & Industry, and ABI/INFORM Dateline. The collection features thousands of full-text journals, dissertations, working papers, key business and economics periodicals such as The Economist and Sloan Management Review, country-and industry-focused reports, and major news sources like the Wall Street Journal. Its international coverage gives researchers a complete picture of companies and business trends around the world.

The Christian Science Monitor‎

(1988 - current) The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) is a nonprofit news organization that publishes daily articles in electronic format as well as a weekly print edition. The Monitor covers international and United States current events. 

Hartford Courant‎ (Historical and Current)

(1764 - 1922) and (1992 - current). The Hartford Courant is the largest daily newspaper in the U.S. state of Connecticut, and is often recognized as the oldest continuously published newspaper in the United States. A morning newspaper serving most of the state north of New Haven and east of Waterbury, its headquarters on Broad Street are a short walk from the state capitol. It reports regional news with a chain of bureaus in smaller cities and a series of local editions.

Los Angeles Times

(1985 - current) The Los Angeles Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California since 1881. It has the fourth-largest circulation among United States newspapers.

US Major Dailies

(1980 - current) US Major Dailies provides access to the five most respected US national and regional newspapers, including The New York Times and Washington Post, co-exclusive access to The Wall Street Journal, and exclusive access to Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune. The titles offer researchers thorough and timely coverage of local, regional, and world events with journalistic balance and perspective. The content is available by 8am each day and provides archives stretching as far back as 1985. This database is available on the ProQuest platform.

New York Times (Historical and Current)

(1851 - 2013) and (1980 - current) The New York Times is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper. As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States. Since the mid-1970s, The New York Times has greatly expanded its layout and organization, adding special weekly sections on various topics supplementing the regular news, editorials, sports, and features.

The Historical Guardian and The Historical Observer‎

The Historical Guardian (1821-2003) and the Historical Observer (1791-2003) offer full page and article images with searchable full text back to the first issue. The collection includes digital reproductions providing access to every page from every available issue. These historical newspapers provides genealogists, researchers and scholars with online, easily-searchable first-hand accounts and unparalleled coverage of the politics, society and events of the time.

Historical New York Tribune / Herald Tribune

(1841 - 1962) Originally called the New-York Daily Tribune, it was the dominant Whig Party and Republican newspaper in the U.S. through the 1860s. During the 1850s it was the largest circulating newspaper in New York City. In 1924 the Tribune merged with the New York Herald to form the New York Herald Tribune, which ceased publication in 1966.

The Wall Street Journal‎ (Historical and Current)

(1889 - 1999) and (1984 - current)‚Äč The Wall Street Journal is an American business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The newspaper is published in the broadsheet format and online. The Wall Street Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation.

The Washington Post (Historical and Current)

(1877 - 2000) and (1987 - current) The Washington Post is an American daily newspaper. Published in Washington, D.C., it was founded on December 6, 1877. Located in the capital city of the United States, the newspaper has a particular emphasis on national politics. The Post has distinguished itself through its political reporting on the workings of the White House, Congress, and other aspects of the U.S. government.