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Archaeology Day: Westport 2017

What is Archaeology Day?

International Archaeology Day is a celebration of archaeology and the thrill of discovery. Every fall the AIA and archaeological organizations across the United States, Canada, and abroad present archaeological programs and activities for people of all ages and interests. Whether it is a family-friendly archaeology fair, a guided tour of a local archaeological site, a simulated dig, a lecture or a classroom visit from an archaeologist, the interactive, hands-on International Archaeology Day programs provide the chance to indulge your inner Indiana Jones. Learn more...

What? When? Where? 

What: Fun for all ages! Professional archaeologists will speak about their work. In addition to a flint knapping demonstration, get your hands dirty in an artificial dig pit!

When: Saturday, November 11 2017

Where: Throughout the Library

Want to know more? Check out the full schedule of events here!

What's New in Archaeology?

Ancient Roman Skulls Show Regional Diversity

Forensic techniques that are used to solve modern homicide cases helped American anthropologists reveal family resemblances in 2,000-year-old skulls from the Roman Empire. Read more...

Aztec tower of human skulls uncovered in Mexico City

Tales of the tower of skulls have been passed down through the generations in Mexico. Said to be the heads of defeated warriors, contemporary accounts describe tens of thousands of skulls looming over the soldiers. Read more...

Neolithic Tomb Unearthed in England

Archaeologists digging at a future construction site in northern England have unearthed the remains of a large collective burial monument known as a barrow. Read more...

Neanderthal Teeth Show Evidence of Dentistry

Evidence found in teeth at a Neanderthal site in Croatia points to rudimentary attempts at dentistry 130,000 years ago. Read more...

Iron Age Textiles Unearthed in Israel

A team led by Tel Aviv University archaeologist Erez Ben-Yosef has discovered colorful Iron Age textiles at the site of the Timna copper mines in Israel's Negev Desert. Read more...

Neolithic Figurine Found in Polish Village

While while on vacation in the village of Kosina in southeastern Poland, an archaeologist stumbled upon a clay figurine that he believes dates back to around 5000 B.C. Read more...

Roman oil and wine pottery found at Ipplepen dig site

Archaeologists say pre-Roman Britons who lived in a rural location since the 4th Century BC may have enjoyed Mediterranean oil and wine. Read more...

7,000-Year-Old High Altitude Site Discovered in Peru

A site discovered in Peru at 12,500 feet above sea level suggests that hunter-gatherers lived all-year-round at very high altitudes beginning at least 7,000 years ago. Read more...

Medieval Abbey Wall Unearthed in England

Archaeologists have unearthed the remains of a fourteenth-century abbey wall in the West Midlands of England. Read More...

Face of 500-Year-Old Dublin Man Reconstructed

Archaeologists have used the remarkably well-preserved skull of a young Dubliner, who died during the Tudor period (1485-1603), to reconstruct the man's face using 3-D digital technology. Read more...

Ancient Fish Trap Discovered in Alaska

A prehistoric stone fish trap has been found on northern Kodiak Island. Read more...

Scientists Examine Possible Link Between Art and Echoes

Science News reports that hunter-gatherers and early farmers living in the central Mediterranean may have been drawn to rock shelters with special acoustic properties. Read more...

Mini Pompeii found in Rome during metro line excavations

Excavations to finish metro Line C in the capital continue to throw up ancient Roman archaeological finds. After a military barracks last year, the latest discovery is two Pompeian buildings near the Aurelian Wall. Read more...

Colonial-Era Brass Lock Unearthed in Michigan

According to a report in Michigan Live, a brass lock measuring nearly three inches long was discovered at the site of a fur trader’s home at Fort Michilimackinac. Read more...

Human Remains Unearthed at Canaanite City

Archaeologists excavating at the Canaanite site of Gezer have unearthed the remains of inhabitants who appear to have perished when Egyptians destroyed the city in the thirteenth century B.C. Read more...

Viking Fortress Yields New Discoveries

Archaeologists working at Borgring, a Viking ring fortress on the island of Zealand in Denmark, have uncovered evidence that challenges conventional wisdom about the site's lifespan and purpose. Read more...

Musket Ball Uncovered at Revolutionary War Site

The discovery of a lead musket ball suggests that archaeologists in Charleston, South Carolina, may have located a Revolutionary War–era trench. Read more...

New Finds From Early St. Louis

Archaeologists working in St. Louis have uncovered evidence that contradicts conventional understandings of the city's founding. Read more...

Fragments of Thutmose I Temple Discovered in Storage

Thousands of stone blocks being kept in storage near Luxor turn out to be remains of the temple of the 18th-Dynasty pharaoh Thutmose I (r. ca. 1504-1492 B.C.). Read more...